Women weaving traditional carpets in Algeria: The ergonomics of weaving posture

Open Access
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Conference Proceedings
Authors: Mohamed MokdadBouhafs MebarkiMourad SemmaniShaikha Aljunaidi

Abstract: In Algeria and many other developing countries, many women do domestic work (weaving, cleaning, washing, ironing, cooking, caring, children the elderly, and persons with disabilities, etc.) in their homes. From domestic work, we refer to carpet weaving. This work is done in most Algerian cities. It is a job that women do at home. They do it while sitting for hours. Researchers show that domestic work require great effort. In addition, it is tiring and strenuous and may have negative effects on body. In this research, the focus will be on carpet weaving in the Southwestern Algeria (the Fatis carpet). Fatis carpet is named after the Fatis Palace (town), located in Tinrkuk area, in the province of Timimoun. (Algeria).This research, aims is to answer the following questions:1.What is the posture adopted while weaving the Fatis carpet?2.What are the body parts where may feel pain at work?3.Are there differences between the highly experienced (10 years and more) and the less experienced (05 years and less) knitters?Method: Researchers used the descriptive survey method, where they observe the Fatis woman as she makes the carpet, and after observing her for a sufficient period, she is presented with a set of questions (the PLIBEL questionnaire) to answer. The sample was (12) women with a mean age of 32.83 years, and an SD of 10.83 years. Tools: Data was collected through observation and PLIBEL Form (questionnaire).Results: This research aims to answer the following questions:1.What is the posture adopted while weaving the Fatis carpet? It has been found that women adopt the sitting crossed-legged working posture while knitting the carpet. The majority of women sit in the workstation for hours. They change it when they leave the work. 2.What are the body parts where may feel pain at work? It has been found that all parts of the body specified in the PLIBEL form (neck/shoulders and upper part of back; Elbows, forearms, and hands; feet; knees and hips; low back) are affected. However, the extent of the impact varied. The knees and hips were affected more than the rest of the other regions.3.Are there differences between the highly experienced (10 years and more) and the less experienced (05 years and less) knitters? It turns out that those with less experience suffer less than those with more experience.Discussion: The results will be discussed in light of the principles of cultural ergonomics. In various situations, it is necessary to resolve the contradiction that appears between the principles of ergonomics and what people are accustomed to and what they carry in terms of social trends by virtue of the societies and cultures to which they belong.Conclusion: This research shed light on the work of women in the textile industry. It was found that women adopt a work posture that needs discussion. It is a research that contributes to the development of social and cultural ergonomics

Keywords: Women at Work, Indoor Work, Weaving Carpets, Fatis, Postures, PLIBEL Questionnaire

DOI: 10.54941/ahfe1003962

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